Twitterific Writing Links

Twitterific

by Elizabeth S. Craig, @elizabethscraig

A weekly roundup of the best writing links from around the web.

Twitterific writing links are fed into the Writer’s Knowledge Base search engine (developed by writer and software engineer Mike Fleming) which has over 30,000 free articles on writing related topics. It’s the search engine for writers.

I’m going to take a short summer blog break and will go dark until July 10th, when I’ll return with an extended Twitterific. :)  Early wishes for a Happy Independence Day for my blog readers in the States.

Alternate Endings to Great Expectations:  http://ow.ly/mZCE301B7nv @TheToast @mallelis

Plot vs Character: What Drives a Great Novel? http://ow.ly/HyU23015k9u @nownovel

Is a Quick Release Schedule Right for Your Books? http://ow.ly/QR1Z3015k6u @ksumnersmith

Take Your Reader to Another World:  http://ow.ly/JpLZ3015keB @KeithCronin  @WriterUnboxed          Continue reading Twitterific Writing Links

Images in Posts and an Amazon Anomaly

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by Elizabeth S. Craig, @elizabethscraig

A note today on what I’ve been working on images in our social media posts and a question for trad-pub to self-pub authors regarding Amazon.

First, the relatively new importance of images on our posts.  Any posts.

I’ve heard for a while that images are vital for visibility.  That can mean getting a really solid book cover design to make your book more salable, but it also means that blog posts and other social media posts get more visibility with a good image attached.

Although I was aware of this for years, I had one big thing  standing in my way…my horrid design skills.  Fortunately, that is no longer a problem.  My design ‘skills’ are just as horrid as ever, but I’ve got free design help through Canva and DesignFeed  . Now I can fake it better.

One of Twitter’s updates appeared to focus on images in its feed–automatic grabs of images on some posts (I’m assuming posts that have the appropriate image size for this type of automatic sharing).  I share a lot on Twitter, but I never deliberately attach photos through TwitPic or whatever the app is…images just upload themselves, which saves me a lot of bother.

I’ve noticed over the last few months that it’s true that posts with images are shared more and get more impressions than Twitter posts with text only.  Even articles I’ve shared that related to poetry, which never used to get shares now get lots of retweets and clicks.  The only thing that’s changed is the fact that Twitter is lifting images to accompany the article.

Second, an oddity with Amazon.  Continue reading Images in Posts and an Amazon Anomaly

Why Free is Still a Smart Marketing Strategy for Fiction Writers

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by Jason Kong, @storyrally

If you’re wondering whether not charging for selected stories is benefiting your promotional campaign, you’re not alone.

With all the free writing flooding the internet, it’s harder to stand out. Even if someone downloads your free eBook, your fiction is competing with all the other stories on that person’s digital reader.

Given the ubiquity of free, it’s reasonable to question whether the market is saturated, thus reducing the effectiveness. I, on the other hand, believe free still works.

Let’s take a closer look on why that is. Continue reading Why Free is Still a Smart Marketing Strategy for Fiction Writers

Twitterific Writing Links

Twitterific

by Elizabeth S. Craig, @elizabethscraig

A weekly roundup of the best writing links from around the web.

Twitterific writing links are fed into the Writer’s Knowledge Base search engine (developed by writer and software engineer Mike Fleming) which has over 30,000 free articles on writing related topics. It’s the search engine for writers.

How a writer wrote 29 stories in 29 days:  http://ow.ly/s4YX301dgNM @sophiegood @Write_Track

Crime Writers: Can a DNA Sample Reveal Age? http://ow.ly/xvGl300Q9M3 @DPLyleMD

Hook Your Reader: 3 Tips for Novelists:  http://ow.ly/hXpF300SzUg @womenonwriting @WriteToSell

Offline strategies for building your email list:  http://ow.ly/rH9T300SArL @cksyme Continue reading Twitterific Writing Links

Mysteries as a Reader and a Writer

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by Elizabeth S. Craig, @elizabethscraig

What makes a solid mystery?   What is it about murder mysteries that draws readers to the genre? How good are mystery writers at picking out the killer as readers?

Today, I hope you’ll join me at Benjamin Thomas’s excellent blog, The Writing Train, where I discuss these questions and others…including why Scooby Doo could be counted as one of my major influences.   :)

Hope you have a great weekend.