Twitterific Writing Links

by Elizabeth S. Craig, @elizabethscraig

Twitterific

A weekly roundup of the best writing links from around the web.

Twitterific writing links are fed into the Writer’s Knowledge Base search engine (developed by writer and software engineer Mike Fleming) which has over 30,000 free articles on writing related topics. It’s the search engine for writers.

Thanks to those heroes who sacrificed their lives in military service.   I’ll be away  tomorrow for Memorial Day but back on the blog on Friday. 

Infinite Complexity: On Translating David Foster Wallace into Greek:  http://ow.ly/yL9H300z9cf @ScottEsposito @thelithub

Essentials For Self-Publishing Authors: 7 Must-Haves:  http://ow.ly/OpXN300ev6p @KifferBrown @IndieAuthorALLI

13 Tips for the Writing Newbie:  http://ow.ly/Qiw5300d443 @LZMarieAuthor

How to Use Guest Blogging to Promote Your Book: http://ow.ly/Jtgg300d47M @BethJHayden for @janefriedman

8 Writing Lessons from Hamilton: The Revolution:  http://ow.ly/WeXI300d4g1  @robwhart @thelithub                Continue reading Twitterific Writing Links

Paring Down Your Social Media Presence

Paring Down Social Media by Elizabeth Spann Craig

by Elizabeth S. Craig, @elizabethscraig

Do you have a social media presence that is gathering cobwebs and making it hard for you to sleep at night?  Okay, maybe you’re not losing sleep over it, but it’s on your mind or somehow making you feel guilty?

Here is a terrific website that takes you directly to the page you need to delete your presence on that particular platform: http://justdelete.me/  . The site bills itself as “A directory of direct links to delete your account from web services.” Continue reading Paring Down Your Social Media Presence

Setting as a Vehicle for Conflict

Setting

by Becca Puglisi, @BeccaPuglisi

I’m sure you’ve heard the saying that a good book should have conflict in every scene. This is wise advice, since well-written conflict begets tension for our characters, which can be passed on to readers, who will sense a rise in energy as they feel that nervous, jittery sensation signaling them that something is going on. We all want readers to have that heightened awareness and interest when they’re reading our stories, and a good way to bring that about is through conflict.

While the most obvious source of conflict is an antagonist who opposes our hero and his goal, it’s simply not reasonable (or sensible) to drag him into every chapter. As a result, we have to find other struggles that make sense for each scene. It may not seem like the most intuitive choice, but I’d like to propose that the setting is one of the handiest sources of conflict, for a number of reasons. First, every scene has a setting, so it’s already built into your story. And with the sources of conflict inherently included in each location, there’s no need to fabricate them—no lengthy set-up involved to put these difficulties into your protagonist’s path. If you’re wondering what sources of conflict I’m referring to, consider the following: Continue reading Setting as a Vehicle for Conflict

Twitterific Writing Links

by Elizabeth S. Craig, @elizabethscraig

Twitterific

A weekly roundup of the best writing links from around the web.

Twitterific writing links are fed into the Writer’s Knowledge Base search engine (developed by writer and software engineer Mike Fleming) which has over 30,000 free articles on writing related topics. It’s the search engine for writers.

How To Cheat on Your Writing Without Getting Caught:  http://ow.ly/3vaw3001hfg @Wordstrumpet

6 Ways to Make Your Writing More Cinematic:  http://ow.ly/nzMW3001hly by Oren Ashkenazi @mythcreants

Giving Your Protagonist Tough Choices:  http://ow.ly/kDr63001her @ceciliaedits

Distribute More Books In More Territories:  http://ow.ly/CiBf300etHh @publishdrive @IndieAuthorALLI                Continue reading Twitterific Writing Links

Making Our Books Visible on Google

Making Our Books Visible on Google by Elizabeth S. Craig

by Elizabeth S. Craig, @elizabethscraig

Today I give you what is likely an incredibly boring post on something I know very little about.  But, because I think it’s important, I’m trying to learn more about it and also share my kernel of knowledge on the subject with you. With that disclaimer, let’s move on. :)

Much is said by industry observers about the problem of visibility for writers. After all, the number of books is growing and it’s harder for readers to find us.

One way that we might be able to give our books a push is in searches.  This can mean making our SEO better on Amazon by tweaking keywords and BISAC.  This may also mean tweaking our sites and individual book pages so that Google can make our book stand out in a search.

This means, in a nutshell,  structured data markup.  This means inserting code/metadata on our site that helps Google understand and organize information to deliver rich results for searches. Continue reading Making Our Books Visible on Google